Author Archives: chrissege

About chrissege

Vice-President of Administration, East Texas Area of Aglow International

Battling for Breakthrough: Lessons from the Dirtmeister

Historically, I have considered myself a meticulous housekeeper;  however, since the last child graduated from college and various volunteer commitments began to fill my days, I have become less rigorous in actually executing my formerly meticulous practices.  Lately, a careful observer would certainly have noticed an impressive layer of dust on the ledge above the front door, and the blinds only looked clean at night.  I excused myself by reasoning that I am home far fewer hours now than when I was shepherding a tribe of children and their young friends; moreover, I reasoned, most people would consider my home clean and inviting, as I am assiduous in cleaning bathrooms and the kitchen, and I am a neatnik by nature.

Even so, as the months flew by, I felt an increasing concern that the house was screaming for attention, and I simultaneously began to dread the length of time it would take to clean everything properly.  Thus began my experience with staying home to avoid exposure to COVID-19.  Finally, my months of procrastination screeched to a halt:  unable to tolerate the ever-expanding pile of cleaning chores at home, I carefully made a list and grouped various tasks into categories that could be tackled over the course of several days.

Last Friday morning, I faced the most daunting task:  two days of vacuuming everything in the house:  blinds, shutters, window sills, baseboards, floors, carpet, and area rugs.  I had remembered that our vacuum cleaner was heavy as well as powerful, but somehow I did not recall it being THIS heavy!  I speculated how much time might have passed since I had last dragged this veritable “dirtmeister”  all over the house, up and down the stairs, all the while disconnecting, attaching, and re-attaching the various vacuuming tools for different surfaces.  This machine, however valuable and effective it might be, had never felt this ponderous!  I wondered to myself whether I simply had somehow morphed into an elderly, feeble lady since my last rodeo with this vacuum cleaner.

In addition to its impressive weight, the machine kept tipping over backwards when I attempted to pull it along behind me.  To make matters worse, the tube accessories that connected to the hose flew apart quite often (except when I wanted to pull them apart to attach a different tool).  Suddenly I found myself vacuuming with a tool attached to nothing.  As the hours of battle wore on, the level of my ire was growing.   That night, with calves aching from dragging this megaton machine around the house, I collapsed into bed.   Perhaps I needed more rest and more regular exercise, in view of my new weakling status.  I consoled myself with the thought that I had vanquished at least half of the house.  As Scarlett O’Hara valiantly declared in the film Gone with the Wind, I asserted, “Tomorrow is another day!”  

The next day continued in the same vein; I tackled the master bedroom and was hopelessly losing the hose behind me and jerking on the recalcitrant beast when it refused to move forward.   Apparently, I started addressing the vacuum as if it were alive, yelling, “Come OVER here!  Stop breaking!”  Unbeknownst to me, my husband came downstairs to check on me, as he had actually overheard my yelling from the upstairs office on the other end of the house!  

At some point in the throes of this battle, I remembered a parenthetical comment my husband had made during the first day of this wrestling match.  I suddenly decided I might as well check the dirt bag to verify whether or not it needed to be emptied.  As I unzipped the cloth bag containing the dirt collection bag, I was aghast to see a bulging vacuum bag that was inflated to the point of bursting (mercifully, it had not done so!).  After laboriously disconnecting it, I lugged it out to the trash — horrified to discover that it weighed as much as a newborn baby!

A few moments later, still aghast at the volume of dirt packed into that bag, I fitted the dirtmeister with a clean bag and re-initiated my quest to finish vacuuming the house.  To my astonishment, I was no longer an elderly weakling!  The machine followed my lead quite readily without toppling over, and I lifted it over obstacles with ease.   (The hoses still fell apart, and one of the tools broke, but I persevered.)

The lesson was not lost on me:   how many times to we long for breakthrough into a new season without realizing we are encumbered in entering it?   How often do I exert an earnest effort to do what needs to be done without considering that I may be carrying detritus around with me that actually impedes my progress into the new season (in this instance, a clean house and a new sense of order in our personal space)?  Oddly, I had wondered for a day and a half why the battle was so fierce and the burden was so heavy — not realizing for a moment that the greatest source of the problem was my own baggage, baggage that belonged in the trash!

Jesus Himself invites us to come to Him when we find ourselves overwhelmed and weighed down by things visible and invisible:. “Are you weary, carrying a heavy burden? Then come to me.  I will refresh your life, for I am your oasis.” (The Passion Translation) Father, expose any hindrances to my spiritual growth that I may be lugging around with me.  Show me what to do to divest myself of things that should be consigned to the trash bin — dead things from past seasons, sins You already forgave, pain You want to lift from my heart.   Help me to be willing to respond quickly to Your revelation so I will be able to move more easily into breakthrough. Empower me to recognize and discard the harmful burdens of the past.  Be glorified in and through Me, Father!  

1 Comment

Filed under Where Are You Headed?, Where Are You Now?

The Holy Hunker

And you will seek Me and find Me, when you search for Me with all your heart.  (Jeremiah 29:13, NKJV)

In these days of increasing challenges, I find myself scrambling to meet obligations, yet grasping for some sense of routine and normalcy — even without an international health pan(dem)ic!  It seems that life these days is being lived on an increasingly precarious edge.   Attempts to cut back, set boundaries, and re-focus on personal priorities often are sabotaged by the urgency of various commitments to which I strive to be faithful.

Suddenly, I find myself confronted by governmental directives to cease and desist from routine activities:  gathering, traveling, meeting together in small groups, using public transportation.  Events I may have felt led to plan or even just attend are summarily cancelled.  Even education is moved online out of concern for infection.

What is the good news about this outwardly imposed isolation?  How could hunkering down in the bunkers of our homes or apartments lead to anything remotely positive, particularly when we witness the economic impact of the corona virus (and understandable fear of it) wreaking havoc with people’s jobs, incomes, and bank accounts?

What remains?  Personally, I am confronted by my own insignificance and human sense of helplessness.  However, I believe the Holy Spirit is calling me to seek Father God more passionately.  Desperation can be good for the soul; the Lord promises to meet me when I seek Him with my whole heart.   After all, He gave Himself wholeheartedly for me, and He is faithful even when I am faithless (2 Timothy 2:13). He is always listening; He longs to hear my voice cry out to Him, and He loves the sound of it!

What an amazing thought that the God of all Heaven and Earth wants my full attention!  I certainly do not deserve HIS attention, yet He gives it to me!

May I cease my restlessness and fretting, and may I seek the Lover of my soul with my whole heart in a deeper way than ever before!  Moreover, may my “hunkering down” not be self-protective, but outwardly directed to the magnificent Lord of the universe.  He wants to heal and touch, not only me, but the hearts of many around me who need His Presence and love in the midst of this season of trouble.  May my response to Him during this tumult be pleasing to Him, and may I reach out to others in need rather than focusing on my own losses, in Jesus’ Name!

 

1 Comment

Filed under Where Are You Headed?, Where Are You Now?

The Times, They Are A-Changin’

As a friend recently described a special envelope she had typically kept in her Bible for safekeeping; in this envelope was a list of significant events in her life, events that served as milestones in her family over a span of several decades.  In hearing her describe the joy she experienced upon discovering the list after having misplaced it for a period of time, it struck me that that list was a part of a permanent, even eternal legacy.  She will give that paper to her children as a record of momentous spiritual events in the life of her family.  Those events have eternal value.
Conversely, some things may contribute to our legacy but may not be a permanent part of it.   Just as we buy different kinds of clothing for different seasons, and we accumulate various types of supplies for particular chapters in our lives (baby bottles, children’s books, snow suits or sleds, pool toys, cameras, typewriters, computers, bread machines, even sound equipment that subsequently becomes dated), some items outlive their usefulness.   At intervals, we are compelled to sort through our “stuff” and give away or throw away things we no longer need (but to which we may have become attached).  This process is not always as simple as it sounds, as nostalgia can easily overwhelm us!
The challenge is to discern what is part of the permanent, eternal legacy of our lives and what might be temporarily vital but not carry lasting value.   With Aglow, we also face new seasons:  we distill what is and will always be part of who we are as a ministry, but we must lay aside the strategies that may have been pivotal in the past, but which no longer are proving useful or relevant in our current culture.   When God has used certain things to minister deeply to us, it can be very challenging to release those activities and approaches.   (Just yesterday evening, I was looking through a photo album and was overwhelmed with nostalgia at the sight of photos of our eldest two children when they were small; even their clothing was very dear to me, as it was passed down to their younger siblings yet ultimately given away or thrown away.  I remember how difficult it was to part with those clothes, as they symbolized the end of an era!  As a result, it was a bittersweet experience to gaze on those photos and wonder how those years had evaporated so quickly!)
The temporary things may CONTRIBUTE to the legacy, but they are NOT the legacy.   Jesus is our inheritance!   I am so grateful!  These days, I am continually asking God what has eternal value and what is merely temporary — what has outlived its season of usefulness — so I can focus on the eternal things.  Often, despite my earnest desire to move forward with Him, I find it challenging to welcome new seasons that, at least at first glance, seem unfamiliar and even frightening.   May the Holy Spirit empower me afresh to embrace the next part of my journey with confidence in His goodness and in the knowledge that He can be trusted to retain those aspects of the past that have eternal value!   Yes, we can agree with the Psalmist that we have a beautiful, eternal inheritance:  “The Lord is the portion of my inheritance, my cup [He is all I need]; You support my lot.  The [boundary] lines [of the land] have fallen for me in pleasant places; indeed, my heritage is beautiful to me.”  (AMP:  Psalm 16: 5-6)
I love this song by Amy Grant called “Heirlooms.”  Jesus is more than an heirloom to you and to me.  We can praise Him forever for that!

Leave a comment

Filed under Where Are You Headed?

Marooned or Moving Forward? Pilgrimage & Promises

pilgrimSometimes we travel through desert seasons in our lives — seasons where we feel the heavens are brass, God isn’t listening (and certainly in not answering!), and our provisions are becoming increasingly depleted.   We wonder what happened to our initial sense of adventure.  In fact, whatever became of our vision?  Will we perish in the dry, desolate, silent space?

God’s Word describes this very predicament:  “Blessed is the man whose strength is in You, whose heart is set on pilgrimage. As they pass through the Valley of Baca, they make it a spring; the rain also covers it with pools. They go from strength to strength; each one appears before God in Zion.”  (Psalm 84:5-7)

It is interesting that God promises blessings to the one whose heart is fixed on pilgrimage, on continuing the journey, no matter how desolate the circumstances in which he finds himself.  That person is determined NOT to stand still and feel sorry for himself, but instead to press on through the Valley of Weeping (Baca in Hebrew), to continue his journey through the difficult straits of life.   Somehow, in the process of moving forward in the dry, sorrowful places of life, water ultimately springs forth in that wilderness.   Rain begins to fall and covers the dry ground with pools (the same word for blessings in Hebrew).  God brings life out of the barren, dry places of our lives if we purpose to move forward through them.

Luke corroborates the principle of pilgrimage when he relates the story of an encounter ten lepers had with Jesus:  “As He went on His way to Jerusalem, it occurred that [Jesus] was passing [along the border] between Samaria and Galilee. And as He was going into one village, He was met by ten lepers, who stood at a distance. And they raised up their voices and called, ‘Jesus, Master, take pity and have mercy on us!’ And when He saw them, He said to them, ‘Go [at once] and show yourselves to the priests.’ And as they went, they were cured and made clean.” (Luke 17:11-14 AMPC)

Sometimes, Jesus heals people instantly.  At other times, healing is a process.   More often than not, we are healed when we purpose to move forward in our inadequacy on the path set before us.  Pilgrimage is a journey with a purpose, often to a new, unfamiliar place.   When we set our hearts on pilgrimage, despite our weaknesses and inadequacies, even infirmities, the Lord brings forth springs of refreshing and blessing, even in the midst of those infirmities.   We are often healed in the going, regardless of how lame or halting we feel.   He meets us in the process of moving forward in the face of lack.

Can I dictate to the Lord how and when He heals me or meets my need?  No! He is God, and I am certainly aware that I am powerless to change myself.  However, as I obey Him in the process of pilgrimage, often not understanding even when I will reach my destination (moving stolidly, even with baby steps, toward Him), He heals me and brings forth life in the wilderness places of my heart.

Father, empower me to keep putting one foot in front of the other!  Strengthen me to move forward on this relentlessly challenging path and trust You to speak life to my personal wilderness.   You will bring forth streams in the desert and will heal my heart “in the going.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Where Are You Headed?, Where Are You Now?

Holy or Unholy Roots?

RootsRecently, when on an evening walk in our neighborhood, my husband alerted me to a significant unevenness in the sidewalk. He wanted to alert me to a very real tripping hazard.  As I looked down, it was glaringly apparent that the sidewalk had been forcibly lifted up by subterranean roots of a tree adjacent to the edge of the concrete.  The lesson was not lost on me.  Aside from the obvious need to observe where I placed my feet in order to avoid stumbling, tripping, or even falling on my face, I suddenly realized that roots affect more than the plant they support.

In some cases, roots stretch deep into the soil below the plant they support; in other cases, roots spread out from the base of the plant and suddenly surface in unexpected places, thereby disturbing what has been placed there.

This disturbance can work both for good or for evil.  In the case of evil, unholy roots, the pernicious effect may remain underground, and therefore invisible, for a season; eventually, however, eventually those roots will surface and wreak destruction in the foundation of whatever has been established in the path of those roots.  Similarly, in the case of good, holy roots, the effect may be delayed until the plant reaches a significant point of growth.  At that critical point, the holy roots have the power to crack the foundation of darkness, no matter how long those roots may have lain invisible, seemingly powerless, below ground.

What’s the lesson?   Let’s examine the roots of our problems and not merely medicate the symptoms.   Those roots MATTER, and they impact those around us.   Are we striving valiantly to stuff our painful experiences from the past and move on, without truly processing them with the help of the Holy Spirit?  At some point, something will trigger those painful roots and cause additional pain.

Conversely, we can trust the holy ROOT (Revelation 22:16) — the Root and Offspring of David, Messiah Yeshua (Jesus Christ).  He is the Holy Seed that will continue to bear fruit that remains, fruit that transforms, fruit that is for food and leaves for healing (Ezekiel 47:12).

Moreover, the root affects the plant, including its branches.  Romans 11:16 admonishes us:  “For if the firstfruit is holy, the lump is also holy; and if the root is holy, so are the branches.” (NKJV)  We can therefore conclude that our good and bad roots affect our branches, our fruit, and the impact we have on those around us.

Father, search my heart and expose any unholy roots in me!  Help me uproot anything unholy in my life, that I might be healed of everything unholy from my past.  Connect me  more strongly to the holy Root, the Offspring of David, Jesus Christ my Messiah, that I might bear good fruit AND have impact for Your Kingdom on those around me, in Jesus’ Name!

Leave a comment

Filed under What about the truth?, Where Are You Now?

Boggle, A New Word, and A New Roadmap

For lovers of words, Boggle can prove to be either an exhilarating or extremely frustrating game.  If you are unfamiliar with this game, the covered box of wooden cubes (engraved with letters on each face) is shaken at the beginning of each round.  Players compete with one another to write down the greatest number of words that can be spelled from the letters exposed after the shaking process.  The words must be formed using adjacent letters on the tray of cubes (diagonally, vertically, or horizontally, in any combination).  The round is timed with a small hourglass, and duplicate words (listed by more than one player) are eliminated from the final word count.  The challenge is to be able to see the words, particularly the less common ones, and write them down quickly.   The cubes are then shaken again for the next round of play.

Just like a new round of Boggle, it seems our society has been undergoing a season of shaking.  Many leaders have resigned their positions or moved into new positions.   Organizations are undergoing re-structuring, and mission statements are being revised.   Companies are learning to adapt to new  types of markets and increasingly complex consumer expectations.  Even the Body of Christ is being shaken as the Church attempts to reach a culture fraught with division and turmoil.

Clearly, we need fresh words of hope in the midst of this instability, as the strategies that served us well twenty years ago are falling short in the face of current challenges, whether in business or in ministry.  Communication methods have been revolutionized, yet we somehow have lost the simplicity of ordinary friendships we enjoyed when life was not so turbulent or complex.  In that sense, Boggle has a lesson to teach us.  The words from the last round do not help us win points in the current round of life.   Strategies that guaranteed success in the past do not motivate us (or anyone else) to take the initiative in today’s chaotic array of activities.  We need NEW WORDS for this NEW SEASON!

Similarly, we need new pathways to reach new destinations; the old routes have been blocked by construction or, in some cases, are even closed.   Just as I find myself needing to update the mapping program on my phone or in my car, I need the Lord to update His spiritual instructions for me to move toward the new destinations and goals He has appointed for me in this new season.

Interestingly enough, centuries ago, the prophet Isaiah spoke clearly about our need to see a fresh word and travel new roads:  “Do not remember the former things, nor consider the things of old. Behold, I will do a new thing, now it shall spring forth; shall you not know it? I will even make a road in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.”  Isaiah 43:18-19 NKJV

God, we DO need some fresh words for this bewildering, unfamiliar season.  Sharpen our vision to SEE the new things You are doing and to recognize the words You are speaking to us.  We want to follow Your directions!

 

2 Comments

Filed under Where Are You Headed?, Where Are You Now?

Pass the Salt, Please!

As a young person growing up in an American household, I do not recall having a fondness for the squishy, nearly flavorless bread available on American grocery store shelves.  As a result, the only time I actually enjoyed eating bread was when my mother baked it herself, which usually was in conjunction with a special meal.  However, when I spent time in France and Germany as a university student, I discovered the marvels of REAL bread — bread from ordinary local bakeries that tasted heavenly, was surrounded with delicious crust, had substance, and actually required chewing prior to swallowing.  I suddenly understood what BREAD should be.  Although my personal preference in physical bread probably does not matter to anyone but me, I do believe God desires me to cultivate a taste for spiritual bread, bread that nourishes, bread that brings life, bread that has eternal weight.

As an adult, sometimes I feel overwhelmed and wonder if there is anything left of me!  When I am depleted — or close to being so — , I remember that I most likely need another serving of REAL bread — the Bread of Life. In John 6:48-51, Jesus said, “I am the bread of life. Your fathers ate the manna in the wilderness, and are dead. This is the bread which comes down from heaven, that one may eat of it and not die. I am the living bread which came down from heaven. If anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever; and the bread that I shall give is My flesh, which I shall give for the life of the world.” (NKJV)  

When I feel exhausted, used up, and empty, I can always turn to Jesus, the One Who loves me better than anyone else could ever love me.  He is the living Word, the Bread of Life, Who infuses me with His very own life.  He is always available, and He always listens.  He never grows stale.  He gives me His life to share with others, as He is the God of more than enough.  He gives me what I need, plus enough to give away.  The Living Word of God — Jesus Christ — is the source of strength and power in my life, and He wants to manifest Himself to others.

Sometimes, however, those around me may not be receptive to the Gospel; they may not wish to hear about God’s faithfulness, power, or sacrifice on our behalf.   Perhaps they have not yet acquired a taste for the Bread of Life.  After all, I have met people who do not realize that there is a better loaf than the ubiquitous and inappropriately-named “Wonder Bread.”  In that case, I need to remember that Jesus, the Bread of Life, also stated that those who believe in Him are the salt of the earth (Matthew 5:13).   As salt, I need to be willing to be poured out on behalf of others (just as Jesus was poured out and sacrificed for me).  

I recall devouring my mother’s homemade dinner rolls with a generous sprinkling from the salt shaker at the table.  Somehow, those rolls, though light and deliciously buttery, tasted even better with salt.   Is it possible that the Holy Spirit is inviting me to be sprinkled over the Bread of Life as I share God’s love and kindness with those around me?  Am I truly the salt on the Bread?  Is God inviting me to enhance the flavor of His Presence as I am poured out for others?  He surely can show me creative ways to present His life to them, ways that will help them desire His goodness for themselves.

Father, help me to be the salt that attracts people to taste of the Bread of Life!  Show me where you want to turn me upside down and sprinkle your goodness on those in my circles of influence!

Leave a comment

Filed under What about the truth?